Largie Ramazani was the surprise name on Manchester United’s list of released players.

Ramazani made a name for himself in the first half of the campaign as he scored nine goals in 13 under-23 games.

United reportedly offered him a new deal, PA’s Simon Peach reports, but he has chosen to take an as yet unannounced contract with a second division Spanish club.

(Photo by Ash Donelon/Manchester United via Getty Images)

Disappointing but understandable

Ramazani seemed to lose momentum at the start of the year, failing to make the under-23 line-up in any of their four fixtures in 2020.

There was a case for the first team to bring him up to the first team to see what he was capable of, having seen him make such a leap from the under-18s to the under-23s in 2019.

But the indecision over his future was likely to have counted against this, and in the end, Ramazani’s path to the first team was just too difficult to negotiate.

In recent years more and more young academy footballers in England are choosing to leave the big clubs ply their trade abroad.

Jadon Sancho was a trendsetter, walking out on Manchester City to try his luck in Germany, where he has become a superstar.

He saw a quicker route to first team football, and it is this example which has inspired others to follow suit, possibly with Jude Bellingham seeing Dortmund as providing an easier first team pathway than United.

 

The recent academy season being cancelled can’t have helped either. Ramazani has not played a single game in 2020, and if he stayed, there are no fixtures yet set to aim to return for.

When the offer comes from another team which can promise first team chances, probably higher wages too than United were willing to offer, it is understandable that a player’s competitive spirit comes out and he wants to take the opportunity.

(Photo by John Peters/Manchester United via Getty Images)

Ramazani proved to himself what he is capable of, and he has taken a braver choice to leave, than to simply stay and enjoy the comfort of Carrington.

In the end the scale of the chance of breaking into the United team was just too tough for the young Belgian.

That’s where United are right now, and only a select few like Mason Greenwood will make the transition to first team level look easy.

He can hardly be blamed for wanting to go and play regular first team football and push himself.

We wish Ramazani all the best, providing he doesn’t go on to embarrass United by becoming one of Europe’s top stars.

Have something to tell us about this article?